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ghoulnextdoor:

 "MELUSINA" by Jay Briggs » Beautiful Savage

“MELUSINA” by Jay Briggs

Production Crew:

Photography: Fabio Esposito

Make up: Zana Moses

Hair: Gaby Winwood

Model: Skye Victoria

Apparel and Styling: Jay Briggs

Yes, I want all of the … headpiece … things. 

Ooooooooh these are so pretty

(via stufftodraw)

Some of the best sketches from this term’s class notes ; fierce ladies (all facing left- something I have to work on).

All done in graphite and/or mechanical pencil.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Heroic and Skillfull

Armor of the Italian Renaissance

Filippo Negroli

Around 1525 a new fashion emerged in armour design, inspired by the forms and ornament of classical art. Embossed in high relief, richly gilt, and inlaid with gold and silver, these lavish parade armours are invariably associated with Filippo Negroli, the most innovative and celebrated of the renowned armourers of Milan. He and his family numbered among their patrons the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and members of the French court. Featuring photographs of shields, helmets, breastplates and other items, this volume displays Filippo’s virtuoso skill at modelling in high relief. Individual commentaries draw on recent research to explain the Negroli armourers’ extraordinary technical abilities which, combined with their imaginative adaptation of antique motifs, resulted in an original art form that evokes the pomp and pageantry of the Renaissance courts.

Burgonets by Filippo Negroli and his brothers

(via crossconnectmag)

Live tarantulas shared the stage with Els Deceukelier in Elle était et elle est, même (1993), a solo piece that Jan Fabre created for the actress
(Photo by J.P. Stoop ; courtesy of Theatre am Turm)
As seen in : 
Antonin Artaud and the Impossible Theatre: The Legacy of the Theatre of CrueltyHelga Finter and Matthew GriffinTDR (1988-)
Vol. 41, No. 4 (Winter, 1997), pp. 15-40Published by: The MIT Press

Live tarantulas shared the stage with Els Deceukelier in Elle était et elle est, même (1993), a solo piece that Jan Fabre created for the actress

(Photo by J.P. Stoop ; courtesy of Theatre am Turm)

As seen in : 

Antonin Artaud and the Impossible Theatre: The Legacy of the Theatre of Cruelty
Helga Finter and Matthew Griffin
TDR (1988-)

Vol. 41, No. 4 (Winter, 1997), pp. 15-40
Published by: The MIT Press

LF Stores

Youth in Revolt campaign

Dian Pelangi

Source: http://dianpelangi.com/

samspratt:

Normally, I feel that whenever I answer questions here, whatever perspective I have to offer will suffice, but this one left me with a laundry list of opinions, most of which conflicted with one another. While it would probably be most expected for me to think that art can change the world, and it’s other professions that serve a more tangible purpose that would look down on art as a career choice – if I’m being honest, my gut feeling was that me deciding to become an artist and continuing to be one IS incredibly selfish and narcissistic. Even when I engage with people considering following a similar career path, my words of encouragement boil down to “I love what I do, it fulfills me immensely”. From artist to artist, that’s exactly what you’d expect, but suddenly I considered the possibility that all of my artistic “advice” was just perpetuating a cycle of selfishness – encouraging people to pursue things only to make themselves happy. Having an impact on the world was never even a consideration, I just… like making things.
Is what I do, is what all artists do, just for themselves? Are we really just choosing a path that puts a smile on our faces when we should be picking careers that tangibly assist people? I was at a loss. I knew that I lacked the proper perspective to answer this question in full on my own.
Thankfully, two of my brothers happen to be in fairly interesting careers that contrast my own as an illustrator: a Doctor and a Rabbi. While we sat around a coffee table in Manhattan eating Thai food — my niece running around in circles holding a Superman action figure, and my 6 month old nephew smiling in a dapper baby outfit while he happily filled his diaper – I broached the question to see what two people who respectively save lives and save souls, would have to say about this. However, unlike myself, they almost immediately dismissed it as absurd.
The narcissism and selfishness was one of the first things they tried to dismantle — saying every profession, no matter how seemingly noble by label, attracts people who do it entirely for themselves, a doctor being no exception. I argued back saying that in these instances though, regardless of the reasons FOR pursuing these practical professions, a doctor still saves lives.
Next on the chopping block, they dissected the notion that artists have no real impact on the world. There were a slew of very expected and easily rebuked statements thrown around. When I told my Rabbi brother that the impact he has on his congregation and community is deep, profound, instantaneously noticeable, and that I don’t have a damn clue whether anything I’ve ever made has affected anyone, he was just his usual humble self and in denial of that fact. But my other brother said something that if there were ever a statement that gave any sort of real answer to a question layered with so many existential onion rings, I felt this was it. He said, and I’m paraphrasing here, “Sam, just look at history, Doctors, Engineers, and Scientists are the people who have an impact in the world and matter the most? If anything you could make a strong argument that these are the professions that are extraneous. Art pre-dates medicine, science, and engineering by very wide margins. Art has grown and expanded exponentially throughout history, it has transformed language and sold belief systems to entire nations. I gain more from looking at a beautiful painting or listening to good music than I ever do from how something is engineered. I mean even on a really basic level of what I do, without artists, what the hell would us doctors learn from? You have no idea how much the field of medicine relies on illustration.”
I didn’t have an argument for that. It was historically sound.
While I’m not sure that I have a definitive answer to your question, after filling my perspective and knowledge gaps from my brothers, I will say this: It’s a slippery slope to say that artists don’t impact the world. Art’s effects may not be as tangible as the aforementioned career alternatives, but it’s still around, broader and more widespread than ever, permeating ever facet of our human-made world. Its effects may not be as quantifiable as how many years a Doctor has kept a person alive, but as most doctors will tell you, quantity of life is not nearly as valuable as the quality of it, yet their job demands that they deliver the number over the experience.
Art demands nothing, we just make it. We express, we depict, and we rage on whether or not our impact can be put into numbers.

samspratt:

Normally, I feel that whenever I answer questions here, whatever perspective I have to offer will suffice, but this one left me with a laundry list of opinions, most of which conflicted with one another. While it would probably be most expected for me to think that art can change the world, and it’s other professions that serve a more tangible purpose that would look down on art as a career choice – if I’m being honest, my gut feeling was that me deciding to become an artist and continuing to be one IS incredibly selfish and narcissistic. Even when I engage with people considering following a similar career path, my words of encouragement boil down to “I love what I do, it fulfills me immensely”. From artist to artist, that’s exactly what you’d expect, but suddenly I considered the possibility that all of my artistic “advice” was just perpetuating a cycle of selfishness – encouraging people to pursue things only to make themselves happy. Having an impact on the world was never even a consideration, I just… like making things.

Is what I do, is what all artists do, just for themselves? Are we really just choosing a path that puts a smile on our faces when we should be picking careers that tangibly assist people? I was at a loss. I knew that I lacked the proper perspective to answer this question in full on my own.

Thankfully, two of my brothers happen to be in fairly interesting careers that contrast my own as an illustrator: a Doctor and a Rabbi. While we sat around a coffee table in Manhattan eating Thai food — my niece running around in circles holding a Superman action figure, and my 6 month old nephew smiling in a dapper baby outfit while he happily filled his diaper – I broached the question to see what two people who respectively save lives and save souls, would have to say about this. However, unlike myself, they almost immediately dismissed it as absurd.

The narcissism and selfishness was one of the first things they tried to dismantle — saying every profession, no matter how seemingly noble by label, attracts people who do it entirely for themselves, a doctor being no exception. I argued back saying that in these instances though, regardless of the reasons FOR pursuing these practical professions, a doctor still saves lives.

Next on the chopping block, they dissected the notion that artists have no real impact on the world. There were a slew of very expected and easily rebuked statements thrown around. When I told my Rabbi brother that the impact he has on his congregation and community is deep, profound, instantaneously noticeable, and that I don’t have a damn clue whether anything I’ve ever made has affected anyone, he was just his usual humble self and in denial of that fact. But my other brother said something that if there were ever a statement that gave any sort of real answer to a question layered with so many existential onion rings, I felt this was it. He said, and I’m paraphrasing here, “Sam, just look at history, Doctors, Engineers, and Scientists are the people who have an impact in the world and matter the most? If anything you could make a strong argument that these are the professions that are extraneous. Art pre-dates medicine, science, and engineering by very wide margins. Art has grown and expanded exponentially throughout history, it has transformed language and sold belief systems to entire nations. I gain more from looking at a beautiful painting or listening to good music than I ever do from how something is engineered. I mean even on a really basic level of what I do, without artists, what the hell would us doctors learn from? You have no idea how much the field of medicine relies on illustration.”

I didn’t have an argument for that. It was historically sound.

While I’m not sure that I have a definitive answer to your question, after filling my perspective and knowledge gaps from my brothers, I will say this: It’s a slippery slope to say that artists don’t impact the world. Art’s effects may not be as tangible as the aforementioned career alternatives, but it’s still around, broader and more widespread than ever, permeating ever facet of our human-made world. Its effects may not be as quantifiable as how many years a Doctor has kept a person alive, but as most doctors will tell you, quantity of life is not nearly as valuable as the quality of it, yet their job demands that they deliver the number over the experience.

Art demands nothing, we just make it. We express, we depict, and we rage on whether or not our impact can be put into numbers.

(via martwhim)

Tags: This.

Triangular spider
Arkys Clavatus
Source : http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/20663560

Triangular spider

Arkys Clavatus

Source : http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/20663560

sss by AlinaSoloviova on DeviantART

sss by AlinaSoloviova on DeviantART

Sans retour by Zwoing on DeviantART

Sans retour by Zwoing on DeviantART